Finding Your “Just Right”: Time to Drink Some Toddy

rooster and cowboy bootsBoots here.  I’m back to finish up this series on Toddy Coffee.  This post is all about drinking . . . drinking Toddy as both a hot and a cold beverage.  After a sip of Toddy, you are going to want to stand up and salute the day with vim and vigor!

You now have your concentrate all good to go.  [Note: Be sure to keep your Toddy concentrate refrigerated.]  It is recommended that you  start with a ratio of 1 part coffee concentrate to 2-3 parts water, milk or whatever non-cow liquid you prefer.  I know that soy is a common moo-juice alternative, but heck, why not step into a new paradigm and try cashew, coconut, almond, rice, or hemp milk?  Whatever your moo-free preference, experiment and find the one you enjoy best.  Doesn’t a caramel sauce & cashew-milk iced mocha sound?

[To read an interesting article on these alternative “milks,” (with info on calories, protein, carbs, sugars, fats, and saturated fats) check out http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-best-cows-milk-alternatives.html]

Mix your Toddy beverage to taste, making your coffee as strong or as weak as you prefer. This is going to be a Goldilocks thing.  Try it.  Taste it.  Adjust it.  Find your Just Right.

ICED COFFEE: For iced coffee, Toddy is truly the best.  Simply pour the Toddy concentrate and water, milk, or moo-free alternative over ice. No need to double-proportion your coffee grounds for a hot-brew method to get a good iced coffee.

HOT COFFEE: Combine your Toddy concentrate with steaming hot water for a bolder, gentler cup of hot coffee — kind of like an Americano — but not really.  Once you tasted the carmel-ly smooth flavor of Toddy, you will know what I mean.

You really want to experiment with all of the fun ideas.  Here are a few more:

  1. Add Toddy to your morning smoothie.  Toddy would be great with a chocolate-banana smoothie.  Yummy!
  2. Be creative with whatever it is that sounds good to you.  Coconut milk?  Protein powder?  An almond butter-mocha-coffee frappe?
  3. Freeze your Toddy in ice-cube trays, and add cubes to your iced beverages and smoothies for that extra-cold punch.  This will keep your drink colder longer and not diluted by water-ice cubes.
  4. alarm clockToddy is versatile and so convenient.  There is never a need to feel strapped for time in the morning as you are dashing out the door.  If you are a fan of the Snooze Alarm, you can even get your drink ready the night before in a pint jar, put it in the fridge, do your crazed morning dash to work, and heat up your coffee right in the pint jar in the office microwave.  Voila! Fabulous coffee with no morning hassle.
  5. And don’t hesitate to add a little Nudge (aka Hooch to my bootleggin’ granny) to make a hot-coffee cocktail — as long as you are not going to be shoeing a horse or operating any heavy equipment.  Irish whiskey is a traditional Nudge additive, but you can try adding vanilla vodka for something a little different.   I am thinking campfire and some yarn spinning right about now!

And speaking of campfires, doesn’t this look like a fun addition to your summer evenings out on the patio or deck? Grab the S’more fixings, pour yourself a coffee nudge using your Toddy concentrate and indulge in the fact that you are in the great outdoors and only just a pebble’s throw from your own door.

What a hoot this stand-alone fire pit would be on your patio!  It would really open up your summer to the great outdoors.  Just click on the image or link below.

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I hope that this little foray into the world of Toddy has been fun for you!  I remember back to when I first tasted it with that fussbudget sister of mine and, at the time, I had to admit to her that it tasted really good.  I generally forego Toddy during the winter months, as I like a fresh, hot brew.  But the summer?  It is so perfect!

And hail all of you hikers, campers, and glampers!  Think about how great Toddy would be out on the trail.  Put it in a  coffee-tight container and you would be good to go for your entire trek.

And you can click here for a comprehensive PDF from the Toddy experts.  There are all sorts of cool recipes in here for lattes, mochas, iced coffee beverages, smoothies, and even ice cream!

And check out this Kindle option for learning more about Toddy:

[Subscribers read for free!]

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Happy Toddy Trails!

xox Boots

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Now . . . Time to Brew Some Badass Toddy!

old boots. s135179597364799095_p1_i1_w693Boots the Badass Coffee Babe here!  And I’m back to talk more about Toddy!  In the last post, I talked about equipment and the chemistry behind why Toddy tastes so darned good.

This post is going to be all about how to make good Toddy.  Getting set up, directions, dos and don’ts, how to store your finished Toddy . . . all of this fun stuff to learn!

First of all, here is a demonstration video — brought to you from the Toddy gurus — that walks you through all of the steps necessary to start brewing.

And here are a few tips from me that urge you to be mindful as you go about brewing your Toddy.  Some of these are a repeat of what the expert in the video advises, but I am not afraid to go overboard when it comes to helping someone else avoid a kitchen disaster. None of the points below can be overstated!

  1. Do not jam the plug into the bottom of the white plastic brewing container/funnel.  Setting the plug using conservative, non-Amazonian strength is sufficient.  You are not going to spring a leak.  Promise.  And attempting to get an over-zealously-jammed plug out of the bottom of the funnel that is full of cold-brew slurry is tempting fate and just plain scary.  One little extra tug of ambition will send your cold brew pouring all over the kitchen.
  2. toddy maker illustrationWhile your Toddy is brewing, put it somewhere SAFE.  The definition of SAFE in Toddy lingo is a place where . . .
    1. . . . your cat won’t tip it over.
    2. . . . your roommates won’t tip it over.
    3. . . . sloppy cords from other appliances won’t slither forth and coil around the Toddy maker such that when you pull your blender out to make a smoothie, you won’t topple the whole Toddy system when you do so.
    4. . . . your other critters won’t have a heyday with it (bird, ferret, sugar glider, etc.  Beware of the darting sugar glider!)
    5. . . . you won’t tip it over.
    6. . . . and again: . . . your cat won’t tip it over!
    7. Use a coarse grind to make your Toddy.
    8. Use good, filtered water.  I cannot emphasize this enough.  If your water tastes like hard well water and you use it to make your Toddy, well . . . you can guess what your Toddy is going to taste like: coffee-flavored hard well water.

There is a theme here: Use good water and don’t tip the dang Toddy over!

Okay!  You now have 12-24 hours to wait until you can pull the plug and drain your Toddy into the glass decanter.

Boots here until next time then when we pull the plug and taste some Toddy!

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Click on the image or the link to view the Toddy brewing system!

And while you are dream-shopping, here is a really good water filtering pitcher.  This pitcher delivers great-tasting water!

Click on the images or the links below.

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Or how about this kicky purple pitcher?

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Time for Toddy, Woodsy Peeps!

Happy Monday!  Boots the Badass Coffee Babe here . . . to talk Toddy!

Mondays. coffeeHow many of you out there have tried Toddy Coffee?  If you have, you recall both the smooth and carmel-ly sweetness of this brew and the ease in its preparation.  If you haven’t tried Toddy, you are going to have to trust me, Boots the Badass Coffee Babe and expert on all things coffee: this is some seriously good coffee!

I remember going on a really crazy trip with one of my sisters.  We were traveling up the Oregon coast and she insisted that we stop and check out one of those cute Victorian-esque seaside towns that you love to hate.  You know the kind.  The sidewalks are narrow and overgrown with thorny rose bushes and stickery shrubberies.  Your fellow tourists are into cutthroat sidewalk chicken and think nothing of edging you out of the herd and into oncoming traffic.  Husbands are lagging.  Children are crying.  Dogs are peeing on the pansies.  Not exactly my idea of fun.

Toddy. image. milk pouring.After what felt like days of being on a forced march, I begged her for a break.  She agreed to seek refuge from the madding crowd and we went into an ice cream shop that smelled of vanilla waffle cones, cherry jubilee, and coffee, sweet coffee.  It was in this emporium we found the Font of Immaculate Conceptualized Toddy.  I confess: after trying Toddy, I was hooked.  It truly is delicious . . . and I learned that it is as easy as 1-2-3 to brew.

Toddy is brewed using a passive, cold-water brewing method that is ideal for the person who is super busy and who likes to repeatedly hit snooze in the morning; who doesn’t want to go to work uncaffeinated and who wants delicious coffee any time of day!

In this series, we are going to talk about

  1. Why Toddy Tastes So Good
  2. How to Brew Toddy and finally
  3. How to Drink Toddy.

Well, today is all about Why Toddy Tastes So Good.  First let me show you what a Toddy cold-brew pot looks like, and then we’ll go from there.  This will all make sense by the end of segment #2 on How to Brew Toddy.  By the time we get to How to Drink Toddy,  you are going to be so happy you’ll be dancing on the barista’s coffee bar and hooting out corny lyrics from an obscure cowboy song.    

Here is the Toddy Brewing Contraption before we go any further. You can click on the image to learn more about this Toddy maker:

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And here is why Toddy cold-brewed coffee tastes so good:

  • It’s designed to brew coffee with 67-percent less acid than coffee made with hot brew methods.
  • Patented cold brew system uses regular coffee beans to create super smooth hot coffee, but with no electricity required.
  • The Toddy Cold Brew System also makes tea, served hot or cold.
  • Set includes brewing container with handle, glass decanter with lid, 2 reusable filters, 1 rubber stopper, set of instructions, and recipe guide.
  • You get more out of your coffee beans, since the coffee concentrate stays fresh for up to 3 weeks.

Tummy sensitive to acid?  Out on the trail with limited access to flame or fuel?  Like your coffee hot and cold?  Penny pinching and wanting to extract the max from those coffee beans?  Brew some Toddy!  The process brews a less-acidic coffee.  It requires no electricity to brew.  You get more out of your beans.

Coffee beans are full of various oils and acids.  This is what gives coffee its delicious flavor.  Cold-brewed Toddy produces less acid and is much more concentrated that hot-brewed, which makes it a great way to make iced coffee.  Toddy will stay fresh in your refrigerator for 2 – 4 weeks — a blessing to all of you busy morning people!

During the winter months, I feel inclined to stick with a hot-brew method . . . but in the summer?  I am all about Toddy!  It is always good to go and, not only is it great for home coffee drinking, it is PERFECT for being out on the trail, on your boat, on a rock face, in a raft,  on blue water . . . you get the idea.  It is one of those brew methods that fits the bill for anywhere!

Fun, right?  Try this cold-brew system out this summer.  You’ll love the flavor profile and the convenience!  And while we are at it, check out these coffee grinders that will help you to get your beans ground perfectly for your Toddy Adventure!

Click on the images below to daydream about a new grinder!

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Stay tuned for BREWING TIPS: How to Brew Toddy in the next post.  Isn’t it fun to learn something new and delicious?  Isn’t it just a hot-damned hootenanny to be able to say, “I know a new way to brew the best-durned coffee!”?

Peep-Toe Boots, Hooker Barb, & Bullshitting Buck

Boots the Badass Coffee Babe here . . .

with some Peep-Toe Boots just for you!  That’s right.  Not pumps, but boots!

Just the name “Peep-Toe” is cute, don’t you think?   Peep-Toe pumps are worn by women who work  downtown.   Maybe girlfriends out for a luncheon.  Or maybe a first date at a coffee bar.  Or a pool party or a high-school reunion.  The connotation is something genteel and a little sophisticated and a little bit kicky, too.  A bit of casual chic polished up with a touch of class.  Peep-toes.  So much fun, right?

Well, for me, I can’t help but associate Peep-Toes with a woman named Barb.  It was the summer when I was working at a primitive fishing camp located on a remote and pristine lake at a high mountain lake.  It was the kind of camp that had no running water, no electricity, and no telephone.  The kind of place where the pack horses roamed with the deer and the dogs ran with the coyotes.  And where men came stag with nary a thought of bringing the womenfolk.

This camp was designed for tough, Bull-of-the-Woods, logger-woodsy types.  Hearty, plaid-shirted, maybe missing a finger or three from setting chains and cables in the woods.  Old-growth beards to match the old-growth trees that they had logged from the forest decades ago.  They wore stag pants, brown-and-white cotton monkey socks (the kind that were worn only in the summertime), and heavy, lace-up boots that defied all logic when worn in the middle of summer.   Hadn’t any of these fellas heard of flip-flops?  Jeez.

The men came up to the lake via a sweat-inspiring trail or by air.  To get there, you hiked up one hell of a trail and up and over a pretty tough pass or, if you had some dough to throw around, you could always “cheat” and fly in on the float plane.  The men arrived  with their “poles” — not rods — to catch rainbow trout.  Their backpacks and coolers were heavy-laden with beer, ham and cheese sandwiches, maybe an apple or banana for the more health-conscious, and worms for their hooks.

They traveled stag — meaning “No Women Allowed.”   They wanted to be able to belch and fart without censure while they fished and talked about politics, sports, and maybe even “the one that got away” (a previous gal pal from days gone by) with their buddies — all while rowing and floating serenely on the blue-green water.

Barb didn’t hike up the trail; rather, she arrived via floatplane.  And she was with her new guy, Buck.  Buck was one of the Regulars, the kind who flew in once a year to re-connect with his Inner Woodsman.  You could tell that Buck thought he was quite the catch.  Graying at the temples and still in possession of a full head of hair, Buck could bullshit with the Best of the Bulls.

After five minutes of bullshitting, any True Bull knew that Buck was not bonafide.  He had never been a chaser, a coiler, or a choker setter — let alone a bucker, faller, or climber.  Truth was, Buck worked for a non-profit in downtown Spokane, Washington, and probably only donned his hickory shirt, stag pants, and corks when he came to the lake to catch some trout.  But not a thing wrong with this.  Nothing at all.  Buck just wanted to lay some claim to his Inner-Woodsman.

This is the part of the story where I start to associate Peep-Toes with Lady Barb.  It was clear that Buck had not prepared Barb properly and truthfully for this particular foray into the wilderness.   (Remember: Buck was a real bullshitter.)  When Barb stepped out of the float plane, she was wearing white jeans, a white top, and the cutest little pair of tangerine and white striped Peep-Toes.  I am guessing that Barb thought that White-Knight Buck was whisking her away to some quaint and well-appointed fishing lodge in the mountains . . . a place where she could book a mani-pedi in the spa after she had a massage from a fully-bearded buckaroo named Billy.

And maybe Buck was happy to have led her along this particular garden path.  Or maybe Buck was just a bit thick and clueless.  Like I said, it was always really hard to tell with Buck.

The plane took off, and I got their boat ready . . . all the while Buck was jawing away at me.  How’s fishin’ this year?  How was the winter?  Snow get pretty high? When did the lake thaw?  Where are they biting this year?  This sort of thing.  Barb, clearly not feeling comfortable, asked me where the restroom was.  After giving her a rather complicated set of directions as to how to find the outhouse behind the main cabin up the hill from the dock, that was the last we saw of Barb for a while.  I finally asked Buck, “Do you think your lady friend is okay?”  But Buck just kept yakkin’ about trout and worms.

Eventually, Barb came picking her way back down the trail.  I couldn’t tell if she had found Ground Zero, but I wasn’t about to ask her.  It seemed indelicate.

Buck and Barb got in the boat tied to the dock and Buck started to get his fishing gear together.  He was in the middle seat — Rowing Position — and Barb made the error of choosing to sit in the bow of the boat.  “Damn, woman!” Buck growled. “I’m not gonna be able to row anywhere with your dead weight planted up there!”

Barb looked very confused, so I explained to Barb in plain English that it was easier to row the boat if the main weight was at the stern.  Hence, the mid-boat transfer began — Barb trip-trapping her way to the stern, doing her best to balance and stay inside the boat  — all while wearing those fancified wedge-heeled, Peep-Toe shoes.

[Nothing like adding a little Ginger-Rogers action to your fishing trip.  But it has to be said: Buck was no Fred Astaire.]

I have to hand it to Barb, as she was doing a damn good job of both trimming the boat and not tipping into the drink.  It was while she was stepping over the middle seat where Oblivious Buck was sitting that she caught Buck’s treble hook  . . . right in her you-know-where: the fork between her legs.

All of Barb’s wincing aside, I thought Buck was going to fall into the lake, he was laughing so hard.  The good news was that Buck had only caught her by the white of her jeans and nothing further.  Thank God.   While Buck and Barb were doing their dang-dest to remove the offending hook from Barb’s private area, Buck kept sputtering, “Damn!  Is it a keeper or a spawner?  A keeper or a spawner?”

I could tell that Barb did not have a fully-stocked fisherman’s lexicon in her brain, as she did not take any offense at the hint that she could be well past her prime as a Spawner — a fish that was only good for throwing back into the lake.  As I used to say when I was just a little tiny baby: Ignorance is bliss.  But I really had to hand it to Barb and give her an A+ for practicality.  While Buck was sputtering and exercising his pocket-fisherman wit, Barb whipped her pants down quicker than a pat of butter melts on a hot skillet.  Smart girl.  The hook extraction was more easily completed, and everyone was happy.  They left the dock, and I can’t really remember them saying if they caught any fish that day or not when they came back to catch the plane.

All of this.  And hence, the saga of Barb, Buck, the ill-placed fishing hook, and the tangerine-and-white Peep-Toe Shoes.

And as I am simply not ready to give up my boots for the summer, I am going for the next best thing: Peep-Toe Boots — in honor of hook-challenged Barb.  Are you with me here?  Here are some super-cute styles!  Have fun perusing and shopping and imagining the fun you are going to have in these shoes.   Not Hooker Barb-fun but real fun.

And Boots the Badass Coffee Babe’s advice for the day:

Never date a man named Buck.

Happy shopping!

P.S.  I always wanted to know what happened after Buck and Barb returned to Spokane.  Did they continue to date?  Did Buck get a cast-iron frying pan upside the head?  Did Barb trade in her pumps for some shit-kickers?  Inquiring minds and all that.

 

Brew Joe on the Go with Hey Joe Coffee GoJoe 2.0

may your cup runneth overGreetings, Good Woodsy Folk.  Before we begin to explore a new and flavorful Outdoor Brewing Method later this week (I’ll give you a hint: it rhymes with body), check out this incredibly clever, high-tech, ultra-convenient way to brew Joe on the go.

Normally, I prefer the simple route when it comes to gear out on the trail — the take-your-time, ain’t-life-great, tried-and-true brewing methods — but I can think of more than a few times when I was hiking through remote places at the height of fire season, and I would have appreciated the convenience of this battery-powered, self-brewing gizmo!

Yes, sometimes practical convenience and deprivation-driven misery wins out over backwoods aesthetics.  And perhaps this gizmo doesn’t deliver the same robust quality of coffee as a cup of campfire Joe, but I am thinking it would be a great back-up option in desperate times.

Like the time I dutifully agreed to go whitewater rafting with a group of people who were bizarrely extreme . . . not extreme in the ways of defying the mighty rapids but in the demands regarding what time we wake up each morning.  According to the dictatorial mandates of Fearless Rafting Leader, the day was already wasted if the group got a start on the river any later than 6:30 am.  It was a rough trip for me, one that was defined by sleep deprivation and negative-vibrational fallout from all of the other bitchy, caffeine-deprived rafters.

I am telling you . .  I would have loved — and I mean loved! — to have had this ingenious cup for that trip.  I could have been blithely floating through the canyon with my delightful cup of coffee — just a push of the button — all the while thumbing my nose gaily and happily at Fearless Leader who actually enjoyed the drama of watching the unwashed and the un-caffeinated fight for their turn with the camp stove each morning.

Life-scarring rafting memories aside, this GoJoe would be ideal for when you are out in extreme conditions: climbing, skiing, boating, river rafting, fire-lookouting, and hiking out in the wilderness where water is scarce, a fire isn’t an option, fuel is scarce, and time is being dictated by a Fearless Leader. Nothing like kickstarting your morning and wilderness experience by simply pushing a button for a cup of Joe!

Check it out!  Watch the video and tell me what you think!

Happy Trails, Good People!

Spur (Small) boots signaturexox

Boots the Badass Coffee Babe

Click on the Hey Joe Coffee GoJoe 2.0 image below:

 


About the Product

  • Fill with water at any time. When your ready, press the button for fresh brewed coffee anywhere
  • With updated, more powerful, battery to last longer and brew hotter!
  • Turn heads everywhere you go with the cool design and smell of fresh coffee

And remember . . .

a day without coffee.jpg

Cowboy Coffee Gear Store

Cowboy Coffee. This post is all about Cowboy Coffee, dutch ovens, and grub box gear. Click on the images and you will find some great pots and paraphernalia for your next camping adventure. Have fun daydreaming about the campfire as you peruse the pots and gear.  So many fun things to consider adding to your grub box! Life is good!

Happy trails, you outdoorsy souls! xox Boots



On the Trail: How to Make the BEST Cowboy Coffee

cowboy-coffeeCowboy Coffee.  This post is all about Cowboy Coffee: how-to directions, brewing tips, proportions, and a few stories, too.  Click on the images and you will find some great pots and paraphernalia for your next camping adventure.  Have fun daydreaming about the campfire as you peruse the pots and gear!  And be sure to visit the Coffee Store on the Home page!  So many fun things to consider adding to your grub box!

Happy trails, hearty souls! xox Boots


Cowboy Coffee.  What exactly is it?  Cowboy Coffee carries with it an image of durable simplicity and unsophisticated invention . . . rugged cowboys, wearing a week’s worth of trail dirt, sipping away at a steaming cup of brew — all the while the cattle are obediently lowing in the near distance, awaiting the call to git along, little dogies.

This hearty brew is an understated science and, as a result, not considered to be a viable, let alone superior, brewing method when out on the trail.  Some people think that Cowboy Coffee is just boiled coffee that likely tastes bitter as a result of being boiled too long over an open flame.

But I am telling you that Cowboy Coffee is more than just throwing grounds into a pot full of water and boiling the bejeezus out of the concoction.  It is an elegant and interactive art form.  And once you have tried a sip of this hearty beverage while taking in the great outdoors, you might be tempted to go back home and get rid of that fancified French press or Italian stovetop espresso maker.

Why is Cowboy Coffee so good?  It tastes just how coffee is meant to taste: robust, hearty, hot, and sturdy.  There are many recipes and opinions on how to make the best Cowboy Coffee, and I am going to share with you the method we used when I was working on a ranch in a remote roadless area of the world.

Now this ranch was the real deal.  No roads anywhere within 50 miles, cold running water only, tent cabins, and outhouses.  And the horses were right there — snorting and neighing and grinding away at the salt lick, outside my cabin door.

The cookhouse was a high-ceiling log structure with long grub tables — each table could easily seat 20+ guests and wranglers, depending on the width of each backside.  The sheer length of these tables was remarkable, with each table top having been cut from single-length logs that spoke of the timeless nature of the forest.  There was an enormous fire-pit and chimney at one end of the cookhouse where the coffee was set to bile.  The chimney had a good draw and provided a fire that you could cozy up to in the early-morning and post-dusk hours.

There were always at least 3 ginormous pots of coffee going at any one time.  There was no system of what pot was brewed first, second, and so on.  You just poured from whatever pot beckoned to you.  These cowboy pots were gallery-quality beauties, smudged and smoked from countless fires.  And heavy.  These pots required a double-fisted pour when they were full.  And the stories that these pots must have heard over the years . . . I can only imagine.

Here is how we made Cowboy Coffee at the ranch:

  1. Start your fire and get a good blaze going.  You are going to want to feed the fire into Boil-Mode flame.
  2. Fill your pot with cold water somewhere about 3/4 of the way to the top.  Do not fill it to the tippy-top.  Your coffee is guaranteed to boil over if you do.  And who wants to waste coffee when you are out on the trail?
  3. Scoop your coffee on top of the cold water.  A general rule of thumb is 2 tablespoons of ground coffee for every 8 ounces of water.  (It really requires that much.)
  4. Be patient.  And watch.  The goal is to let the water come to a boil and swallow the grounds that are on top.
  5. This is the fun part.  Keep watching.  Watching the fire with one eye and the coffee with the other.  My idea of fun anyway.  Once the grounds are seized by the tsunami and they are engulfed, you should see no fresh grounds lingering on top.  Just brew that looks like grounds might be swimming around in it.
  6. Pull the pot from the main flame — just far enough to stop the boil but close enough to keep the coffee nice and hot.  This is trickier than you might think.  You don’t want to re-boil the coffee.  But you do want to keep it piping hot.  It’s a science, remember?
  7. Pour a cup of cold water over the coffee.  Don’t dump the cold water — pour it.  This gesture, be it fact or fiction, serves to settle the grounds to the bottom of the pot.  If you are a doubter or a skeptic, just do it and believe.
  8. Let it all settle for a bit and then pour your first cup of coffee.  It is going to be amazing!

One note about the importance of proportion: It pays to measure.  Proportion does matter in the science of coffee — if you want good coffee.  Just because you are on the trail doesn’t mean that you can be all willy-nilly about measuring.  Before you go on your trip, do some preemptive measuring.  Figure out how much water you will be pouring into the pot and do your math.

Here are some proportion examples for those of you who feel math-curious.  If you are serving a lot of coffee to a large group using a 20-cup ( 160 oz) pot . . . 160 oz / 8 oz = 20 cups x 2 T. = 40 Tablespoons . . . which = 2.5 cups of grounds.  Now before you say Whoa Nellie! think about it.  That is a LOT of coffee to be serving and your attention to proportion will be appreciated.  Another example: If you are using a 64 oz pot and shooting for an 8-cup experience, that will be 64 oz/8 oz = 8 cups x 2 T. = 16 T. . . . which = 1 cup of grounds.

It is true that some old-timers keep adding water to the pot and reboiling the grounds . . . freshening it up a little with some new grounds.  I remember Al, the Cowboy Coffee aficionado, who lived in the school bus across the road.  I would pick up his pot to pour myself a cup and, judging by the weight, assume it to be full of coffee.

But . .  . when only a trickle of brown-black oil dribbled out, I knew it was time to clean the pot for Al.  I would take the pot back home, dump the grounds in the garden, scrub and shine it up for him, and leave it by the fire pit stationed outside the back-emergency bus door.  I understood Al’s theory of skimping on labor, but sometimes you just gots to start with fresh!

And the advice about adding eggshells to the pot?  Many people swear by this.  They claim that adding the eggshells keeps the grounds on the bottom of the pot, keeps the actual coffee grounds-free, and takes the bitterness away.  How?  The eggshell is an alkaline and the coffee is an acid.  The acidity in the coffee is supposed to be reduced by the alkalinity of the eggshells — thus making it taste smoother.

Fact or fiction?  I don’t know.  But it is an awfully fun fact to be able to share when sitting around the campfire.  I have done both and have been happy with my coffee both ways.  But some old-timers?  They swear by the eggshells trick.  Why not try it?  It is fun to experiment and try new things!

Check out these GREAT coffee pots and camp cups that are perfect for the trail.  Pack your coffee tin (or baggie) inside the (clean!) pot as you travel to minimize bulk.  Depending on the size of pot you buy, you can even put your cup in there.

Have fun making Café  à la Cowboy.  By doing so, you are keeping the spirit of the trail alive.